Layering, Long Exposure, and Night Photography

With the weather finally getting nicer here in the North East I’m taking plenty of opportunities to get out and do some night photography.  Living here in Philadelphia traditional landscape opportunities are limited but cityscapes are in full force.

I’ve been working with some creative long exposures including star trails and the Milky Way.  I think it’s unique to see these types of things in a city atmosphere.

Here is a shot of the Ben Franklin Bridge in Philadelphia, PA from Race Street Pier.

Canon 6D
Canon 16-35 2.8L

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Here are 8 different exposures.  Six of them make up the star trails and the other two represent the HDR of foreground and the bridge.

This photo is down on Penn’s Landing in Philadelphia, PA.  The recently opened a roller rink with beer garden, mini golf, Ferris wheel, and more.

Canon 5D MKIII
Canon 24-70 2.8L II

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This image is composed of four exposures.  One main one and the 3 that make up the star trails.

This is not typically my style but as I’m learning new techniques of photography I’m willing to expand what are “typically” considered the ethical boundaries of traditional photography.  What do you think??

 

How To Not Let Facebook (Completely) Ruin Your Photos

Why must Facebook hate us all?  (especially small business)

Anyway if you’re like me you’re beyond frustrated with how much Facebook compresses and degrades the quality of the images we take.  This may be a good point to mention that if you’re just posting selfies using those horrible front facing cameras this post will not appeal to you.

But for the rest of us who take the time to compose and edit even our images shot with smartphones this is become infuriating.  I get it… over 500 million images are uploaded to Facebook every single day.  Perhaps they use some of that half of a trillion-dollar market cap to pay our buddy Jeff Bezos for some more server space.

Finally fed up I decided to do some quick testing here during my lunch.

I decided that I would compare the two main ways to post a photo to Facebook.

  1. Upload it directly to Facebook and watch the amazing image quality of my full frame dslr go to shit.
  2. Upload the same full resolution file to my website and link the image to my Facebook feed.

Here is what I learned:

When it comes to the preview image Facebook uses a MUCH higher resolution than the preview created when I like to my website.  Here is a screen shot test.

Screen Shot 2017-08-16 at 1.52.59 PM

The top image was the image directly loaded to Facebook and the bottom is linked from my website.  The easiest place to notice the difference in quality are the power lines in the top left hand corner of the photo.

Now here is the dilemma.  If you click to enlarge the image that was uploaded directly to Facebook it looks like it was taken with a Motorola Razr.  If you don’t know what that is google it.

When you click on the image linked from my webpage you get a beautiful super high-resolution jpg image which is how myself and tons of photographers would like to have them viewed. (plus it gives us a hit on our website)

So I thought to myself why can’t I have both.  So I uploaded the image to a post directly to Facebook but I also included the direct link to the image and it turned out like this.

Screen Shot 2017-08-16 at 1.54.42 PM

Screen Shot 2017-08-16 at 1.55.07 PM

Does this work?  Sure. But only if your viewer is really paying attention.  (News Flash:  None of them are). And what I mean by that is this.  If you click on that ugly URL at the top you’ll get the full resolution image you hoped that everyone would see.  BUT if you click the image itself you’re linked to the uploaded over-compressed image on Facebook that again.  Is absolute trash.

So forgive me if the title of this post was misleading but I need to start a dialogue on this in hopes that there is a better way to accomplish hosting high-resolution images on Facebook.

Let me google that for you.

And for all of your who made it this far…  Here is the high resolution image.  Enjoy.

Sunset Over Boat House Row

A Weekend With a Canon 5D MK3 and Canon 16-35 L

As I’ve been considering the switch to a Full Frame camera I thought it would be a good idea to spend sometime with one before making the investment.  I was lucky enough to rent a Canon 5D Mark 3 & Canon 16-35mm 2.8L for the weekend to replace my Canon 60D and Toking 11-16 2.8.

First impression.  Well that just expedited the process of wanting to upgrade.  The body feels perfect in my hand.  From the size to the weight its feels excellent.

I was blown away with the colors and contrasts of the 16-35 L Lens.  Here are a few of my favorite shots from the weekend.

Click on the thumbnail to enlarge and see metadata.

Philadelphia

A Few Weekdays in Philadelphia

Been lucky enough to be living in this awesome city for about 3 years now.  The past 3 weeks I’ve been carrying my SRL with my almost everywhere.  Between working two jobs and being a grad student I still try to find time to capture what I see as beautiful.

Feel free to enlarge each photo for specific metadata. (Please comment as well)